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August 25, 2002
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Arafat's group, Fatah, murders Palestinian mother of 7

The Jerusalem Post (www.jpost.com) reports that the barbaric Fatah group, that directly reports to Yasser Arafat, shot and killed a Palestinian mother of seven after accusing her of "collaborating" with Israel.

Ikhlas Yasin, 39, was shot in the town's main square.

Her bullet-riddled body was found lying in the street Saturday after she was kidnapped a day earlier.

Dozens of suspected Palestinian collaborators have been killed since the beginning of a Palestinian uprising in September 2000, but Yasin was the first woman reported to be executed.

Palestinians in the city told the Post that her son, who had been kidnapped earlier by Fatah gunmen, had confessed that his mother had helped the Israeli security forces in killing Ziad Da'as, a wanted member of the Brigades.

There was no trial or due process - just a bunch of Palestinian thugs shooting a Palestinian woman in the head. This is worst than Pakistani law, where only the word of a Muslim accuser is needed to prosecute a non-Muslim on blasphemy charges, which can carry the death penalty upon conviction (see "Pakistani Muslim Court sentences Christian to death for calling Islam a fake religion").

I copy the full article below.

Palestinians execute mother of seven as alleged collaborator
By KHALED ABU TOAMEH, Aug. 25, 2002
http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?
pagename=JPost/A/JPArticle/
ShowFull&cid=1029920525852

At least 200 Palestinians suspected of collaborating with Israel are being held in Palestinian Authority prisons, according to Palestinian sources.

Most were arrested by PA security forces in the Gaza Strip over the past two years, the sources told The Jerusalem Post.

A large number of the suspects are being held in the Gaza Strip, where most of the PA security installations and prisons remain intact.

Yesterday members of Fatah's military wing, the Al Aksa Martyrs Brigades, shot and killed a mother of seven in Tulkarm after accusing her of collaborating with Israel.

Ikhlas Yasin, 39, was shot in the town's main square.

Her bullet-riddled body was found lying in the street Saturday after she was kidnapped a day earlier.

Dozens of suspected Palestinian collaborators have been killed since the beginning of a Palestinian uprising in September 2000, but Yasin was the first woman reported to be executed.

Palestinians in the city told the Post that her son, who had been kidnapped earlier by Fatah gunmen, had confessed that his mother had helped the Israeli security forces in killing Ziad Da'as, a wanted member of the Brigades.

At least 14 Palestinians have been killed in Tulkarm over the past three months on charges of collaboration with Israel.

More than 60 Palestinians from the West Bank and Gaza Strip have been killed since the beginning of the intifada for allegedly helping Israel's Shin Bet security service. The PA executed at least five others for the same reason.

Among the suspects now awaiting trial are also some former Fatah and Hamas activists who have allegedly confessed to being on the Shin Bet's payroll.

Palestinian human rights groups and families of the detainees have complained that many were tortured during interrogation and some were forced to sign confessions.

Two of the suspects, described by Palestinian security officials as the most dangerous collaborators to be uncovered since the establishment of the PA, are expected to go on trial before a state security court in the Gaza Strip next month.

One of them is Haidar Ghanem, 39, of the Rafah refugee camp, who worked as a field researcher for the Israeli human rights organization B'tselem. He told his interrogators from the Preventive Security Service that he was recruited by the Shin Bet in 1996.

Since then he is said to have helped the Israeli security forces track down a large number of wanted Fatah and Hamas activists. He is also suspected of involvement in the assassination of Fatah leader Jamal Abdel Razek, who was killed when IAF helicopters fired missiles at his car in Rafah.

The second suspect, Akram Zatmeh, 23, was arrested recently also by the PSS on charges of assisting Israel in the assassination of top Hamas terrorist Salah Shehadeh, who was killed together with 15 people when an IAF F-16 dropped a one-ton bomb on his house in Gaza City on July 22.

Ghanem and Zatmeh now face the death penalty, and there is little doubt that PA Chairman Yasser Arafat will approve the sentence.

It is thought he will be seeking to send a message to disillusioned Fatah and Hamas gunmen that he does not hesitate to execute collaborators, even when his generals and colonels are sitting at the same table with Shin Bet chief Avi Dichter and other senior Israeli security officers.

The sources said that the next few months will witness a large number of executions of collaborators in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. They stressed that only those who committed "serious crimes" and helped Israel assassinate wanted activists would be executed.

"Arafat is under tremendous pressure to execute many collaborators," the sources added. "That's because there is a feeling that the Israelis have managed to recruit many collaborators. This explains why many top Hamas and Fatah activists have been killed or arrested by the Israeli army in the past few months."

The number of suspected collaborators held in the PA's West Bank prisons is not known, but one source put the figure at 50 to 80. Some 100 suspects managed to escape from PA prisons when the IDF first entered the cities and villages during Operation Defensive Shield. Some told the IDF that they had been brutally tortured.

Posted by David Melle at August 25, 2002 10:35 AM
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(According to digits.com)