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October 26, 2002
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Technion, Israel's MIT, key to Israel's future

The Miami Herald (www.miami.com) has a good article on how support for the Technion, Israel's Institute of Technology, is vital to Israel:

''Were second to the U.S. in technological sophistication- this little Israel. And its all because of this school,'' Horev said. ``Our economic posture has changed drastically. We were once agriculturally oriented, but not anymore. Israel cannot develop without the technological advancements that occur at Technion.''

Ninety of Israels 100 largest companies are managed by Technion graduates, and alumnae generate nearly a third of Israels $100 billion GDP.

I studied at the Techion from 1987 to 1991. My first major was "Aeronautics and Space Science", but I switched to Computer Science later on (and I don't regret it). I'm damn proud of the Technion and its incredible achievements.

The official site of the Technion is www.technion.ac.il and you can make a donation here at the American Technion Society.

I got the link from the excellent Israpundit - I copy the full article below.

Support of Technion vital to Israel says former IDF general
BY ALEX HANDWERGER, Special to The Jewish Star Times
http://www.miami.com/
mld/jewishstartimes/4343160.htm

In addition to the latest Middle East conflicts and a looming U.S.-Iraqi war, Israelis have another concern: their lagging economy. According to retired Israeli army Major General Amos Horev, the key to Israels economic future lies in Technion (The Israel Institute of Technology), known as the MIT of Israel.

At a speech on Oct. 19 to the Southern Chapter of the American Society for Technion in Jupiter, the former general explained the vital connection between Israels economic independence and Technion, the countrys leading center for technology and research. Horev, who served as president of Technion from 1973 to 1982, said the institutes technological advancements fuel the economy by providing high tech exports and growth within the country.

''Were second to the U.S. in technological sophistication- this little Israel. And its all because of this school,'' Horev said. ``Our economic posture has changed drastically. We were once agriculturally oriented, but not anymore. Israel cannot develop without the technological advancements that occur at Technion.''

Ninety of Israels 100 largest companies are managed by Technion graduates, and alumnae generate nearly a third of Israels $100 billion GDP.

Technions developments not only boost the economy they significantly aid the military, Horev said. The Israel Defense Force (IDF) benefits from the institutes latest advancements and its alumnae who work for the military upon graduation.

Horev knows well the connection between technology and security. After serving in the military for six years, he fought in the War of Independence, helping to bring about the state of Israel in 1948. Once that was accomplished, he was ready to leave the military.

''I was in the process of leaving the army and the chief of staff made me an offer I could not refuse,'' Horev said.

The army sent Horev to MIT where he studied engineering. Upon graduation, his new technical role in the military allowed him to play a key part in the expansion of the Israeli defense industry.

Due to arms embargoes in the fifties and sixties, Israel was forced to produce their own weapons.

As chief scientist for the Ministry of Defense, Horev helped further weapon development and research.

After his service to the military was through, Horev became president of Technion, located in Haifa, where he used his military training to build the school up from one building to a full-fledged campus.

''I came to Technion after many years of leading people,'' he said. ``I had to lead thousands and thousands of officers in the military. I had to do that at Technion too.''

Currently, Horev serves on the board of directors of several high tech companies and, until recently, was chairmen of Rafael, which researches, develops and produces sophisticated military equipment supplied to the IDF and sold to other countries.

In Jupiter, he wrapped up a lecture tour, which brought him to Boston, Seattle, Los Angeles and Houston.

The American Society for Technion, a fundraiser for the institute, has raised nearly $860 million since its founding and is currently conducting a $750 million campaign.

''If you are a Zionist, there is no better way to support Israel than through Technion,'' said Al Effrat the societys Southern region director. ``It is the engine that drives the economy of Israel. Its tremendously important to American Jews.''

Also speaking at the event on Saturday were the Consul General of Israel to Florida and Puerto Rico Miki Arbel, and a Technion alumnus living in Miami Beach, Hector Hocsman.

Posted by David Melle at October 26, 2002 02:01 PM
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