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December 15, 2003
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Israel develops gun that shoots around corners

The Jerusalem Post (www.jpost.com) reports that Israel has developed a gun that can shoot around corners:

Murderous Bastards from the Palestinian Islamic Jihad and Al-Qaeda will not know what hit them

Shown to the public for the first time Monday, the "Corner Shot" is actually an apparatus containing a small, high-resolution camera that attaches to handguns. It allows the operator to stick the pistol around a corner without exposing themselves, aim and fire. [...]

The apparatus can house a variety of pistols, including GLOCK, SIG SAUER, CZ and BERETTA handguns. It can also be adapted to fit an M-16 rifle or tear gas launcher. The device swivels 63 degrees to the left or right and is the only system in the world that allows the shooter to keep their entire body around a corner and out of the line of fire, Golan told reporters.

"The Corner Shot weapon system can be extremely beneficial in the global war on terror. It protects soldiers' lives and increases their chances of survival, while drastically improving their ability to gather information," said Golan, 49, a former deputy commander of an anti-terror unit.

The unit was particularly suited to urban warfare or commando raids into airplanes, buses or trains, he said.

"The Americans are very interested in this," Golan said. "I believe from what I have seen and heard that it can be a big success in Iraq because the Americans are dealing with an urban area there."

I copy the full article below.

Israel reveals gun that shoots around corners
By ARIEH O'SULLIVAN, Dec. 15, 2003, Link

From the nation that developed the Epilady feminine hair remover and bomb sniffing pigs, now comes another invention the gun that shoots around corners.

Shown to the public for the first time Monday, the "Corner Shot" is actually an apparatus containing a small, high-resolution camera that attaches to handguns. It allows the operator to stick the pistol around a corner without exposing themselves, aim and fire.

The inventors displayed their new device to reporters Monday at a shooting range in the center of the country. Interest in the "gun that doesn't shoot straight" was extremely high, with over 50 reporters from Israel and around the world showing up for a first hand look. Some even fired a few rounds.

Demonstrators at the Shoham Firing Range showed how it could be fired around building corners, demolished doorways and from a hall into a room.

Veterans of Israeli secret service units, the inventors said worldwide patent was currently being used by Special Forces, military units and law enforcement agencies around the world.

Inventor Amos Golan said US troops were already training with the weapon and that the armies of 15 other countries are currently testing the system. Golan said that IDF units would start using it shortly.

The apparatus can house a variety of pistols, including GLOCK, SIG SAUER, CZ and BERETTA handguns. It can also be adapted to fit an M-16 rifle or tear gas launcher. The device swivels 63 degrees to the left or right and is the only system in the world that allows the shooter to keep their entire body around a corner and out of the line of fire, Golan told reporters.

"The Corner Shot weapon system can be extremely beneficial in the global war on terror. It protects soldiers' lives and increases their chances of survival, while drastically improving their ability to gather information," said Golan, 49, a former deputy commander of an anti-terror unit.

The unit was particularly suited to urban warfare or commando raids into airplanes, buses or trains, he said.

"The Americans are very interested in this," Golan said. "I believe from what I have seen and heard that it can be a big success in Iraq because the Americans are dealing with an urban area there."

Co-founder and developer of Corner Shot Maj. (res.) Asaf Nadel claimed the system is designed to engage targets from the left and right, up and down, without the removal of hands from the weapon.

"This shortens reaction time and increases accuracy in sudden engagement situations," Nadel said.

The detachable camera is a day/night thermal image maker and can zoon in up to 400 meters. The video image can be relayed to other team members or to command posts in the rear. Its accessories include infrared laser illuminators, rubber bullet launchers and silencers.

The US-funded company is headquartered in Miami, Florida with its research branch located in Israel.

The development of the idea took three years, and sales began three months ago. The weapon system costs between US$3,000 and US$5,000, depending on the components.

The mechanism has been patented in the United States and will be sold only to official government agencies, Golan said.

Posted by David Melle at December 15, 2003 12:23 PM
Comments

Now for the very first time, an effective M16/AR15/M4 iron sight for use with the NBC mask. Go to my new website and take a look! Thats at www.gincvision.com

Ray

Posted by: NBCtechnician on May 28, 2006 09:19 PM

how much does this cost

Posted by: Matt on June 5, 2006 03:23 PM
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(According to digits.com)